Structural Engineer Home Inspection Blue Oaks Roseville, CA

Posted in Qualified Home Inspectors in California on July 11, 2017
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A professional home inspector is not only familiar with all the components of a home, but is able to evaluate the condition of the home and all of its systems. Professional Home Inspectors in Blue Oaks Roseville, CA will point out the components that are not working properly as well as those that are unsafe. They will address areas where repairs may be needed or where problems may arise in the future.

How to Choose the Best Home Inspector in Blue Oaks Roseville, CA?

Home Structural Inspection

The purchase of a house is probably the largest single investment you will ever make. So, it only makes sense that you should know exactly what to expect, both indoors and out, in terms of repairs, maintenance and the associated costs that come with a new--or old--home. One of the best ways to understand a home's condition is to hire a professional home inspector.

It is easy to get a List of Roseville Home Inspectors by searching online. A simple search with the keyword, “Home Inspectors in Blue Oaks Roseville, CA” will produce multiple results giving you a list of Home Inspection companies, Realtors, and Real Estate Agents.

A professional home inspector is also able to make an unbiased and accurate report of the property's true condition as an expert in home inspection. This knowledge will make it much easier to assess an accurate value of home property.

Even the most knowledgeable homeowner lacks the training and depth of knowledge that only a professional Roseville home inspector provides. That is why it is so important to hire an experienced home inspector to perform the inspection on a home's property. When selecting a home inspector, be sure to choose one that will give you the quality of service you deserve and that you feel comfortable with. Consider the following questions when selecting a professional home inspector:

What are the home inspector's qualifications?
Home inspection is a trade that requires special training, knowledge, and skills. The more experienced a true professional home inspector is, the more likely they will be able to uncover any problems. Look for professional home inspectors that have sufficient practical experience, a general understanding of all components in a home, and a background in related trades. Reputable home inspectors are also more likely to be certified with a well-known association, such as ASHI (American Society of Home Inspectors) that requires them to adhere to a strict code of ethics and specific standards of practice. Always ask about their membership in various associations. You also have the right to see proof of their membership.

Certified Electrical Inspector

Can the home inspector provide quality references?
A highly regarded professional home inspector should be able to provide you with references upon your request. Be sure to take the next step and contact the people named as references Ask them if they were satisfied with the inspector's complete service and their overall experience with them.

Will the home inspector allow you to participate?
A professional home inspector in Blue Oaks Roseville, CA should feel comfortable allowing you to participate throughout the inspection. Don't be afraid to get your hands dirty and ask questions along the way. A home inspectors purpose is to educate you on your home and all of it's components--learn all you can. A good suggestion is to do a little research on your home beforehand and come prepared with a list of questions for the inspector.

What is the scope of inspection?
A standard home inspection report summarizes findings from a visual inspection of the home's interior and exterior components. Exteriors components include roofing, flashing, chimneys, gutters, downspouts, wall surfaces and the foundation, including the grading around it. Interior components include electrical, heating, air conditioning, ventilation, plumbing, insulation, flooring, ceiling and wall finishes, windows and doors, basements, and any visible structures of the home. Upon completion of the inspection, the certified home inspector should provide a clear, easy to read report detailing every major home system and component within 24 hours. A good home inspector in Blue Oaks Roseville, CA will also provide you with pictures of various elements to help you see and understand the true condition.

Questions For Home Inspector to Answer?

Property Inspection Service

Choosing the wrong Home Inspector can cost you a lot more than the fee you paid. If you choose a home inspector solely on price alone, your headed down a dangerous highway.


I'm still amazed at people who will spend countless hours, days and months looking for just the right home and then choose a home inspector solely because he was $50 or $100 than the next guy.


Home Inspector Schools are turning out record number of new inspectors. These people come from all walks of life. One week they are the door greeter at a department store, the next they're a "Certified" home inspector.


Before choosing any inspector there are some things you need to know.


Tip #1: Research, research and research some more. Find out as much as you can about the inspector you want to hire. Call them up and speak with them over the phone. Are they easy to talk to? Are they knowledgeable about homes? Will he/she email you a sample report? Is the report easy to read and understand?


You may also want to ask your friends and coworkers for referrals. However, never take their recommendations blindly. The majority of people have no idea if they received a good inspection or not. They just know they like the inspector and he pointed some things out. Research, research, research!


Tip #2: Never hire an Inspector solely on the recommendation of your Real Estate Agent. While you may think that your agent hung the moon, they could be pushing you to use a "wink and nod" inspector, or as we in the business call them, "Drive by Inspectors." They grab your check as the drive by the home their suppose to be inspecting. These types of inspectors "don't rock the boat" or are not "deal killers".


These inspectors get their business from agents who control them. The agent knows the inspector will see to it that the inspection doesn't derail the transaction. Even if your agent recommends 2,3 or more inspectors, it's wiser to avoid the conflict of interest and find an inspector who works for you and you only.


Tip #3: Why the word "Certified" may not be a good thing. Listen up. You can become a "Certified" home inspector by sending a hundred dollars or so to one of many home inspection associations. No experience required. Just send them the money and they send you a "Certified" certificate.


Sure, it's good that your inspector should belong to some state and national home inspector associations. Most professionals in any business belong to industry associations in their field. Home inspectors are no different. However, there are many companies out there looking to make a buck off the backs of new home inspectors. Don't fall for the "Certified" or "Master Certified" home inspector label. Some of these organizations use the word "Certified" in their name to try and sound credible. Buyer beware.


If you're looking for an inspector on new construction, you do want to look for a Code "Certified" inspector.


Two national home inspector associations that you can trust are the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI)- http://www.ashi.com and the National Association of Home Inspectors (NAHI)- http://www.nahi.org.


ASHI has very strict requirements for membership including passing the National Home Inspector Examination. NAHI has similar requirements.


Tip #4: You get what you pay for. Price should be at the bottom of your list of priorities when shopping for an inspector. A good, thorough and knowledgeable inspector will save you money while a poor inspector will cost you many times their fee. You may need that $100 bucks you saved to try and repair that $10,000 roof your inspector failed to warn you about.


Let's take a 2000 square foot home. A top of the line inspector who knows what he's doing will cost you approximately $350 to $600 for this size home, depending on a few variables. You have to ask yourself, if the inspector I choose charges less, why? What will be missed or left out of the inspection?


On the other hand, a good inspector will find things others will miss. You may want to go back to the Seller and renegotiate the price of the home. I've seen Sellers drop their price $30,000 because of the items we found wrong with homes. I've also saved my Clients countless thousands of dollars by brining major defects to their attention before they signed on the dotted line.


Tip #5: Check with you state to see if they require home inspectors to be licensed. More and more states are requiring home inspectors to be licensed. Even in these states, there are some inspectors who can't meet the standards and will be performing illegal inspections. Check them out before hiring them.


Choosing the right Home Inspector is a very important process when buying a home. Don't leave it to chance. Do your homework and you'll be money ahead.

Where & How Do I Contact A Home Inspector In California?

Manufactured Home Inspection

Congratulations, you've found the perfect home to buy! Right about now, you are probably on information overload, and looking for resources to get everything ready. One of the most important steps you need to take after getting that ratified contract is to get the home inspected. Like most subjects on the internet, there is a ton of information about home inspections, and how to hire them. One source that is very underrepresented though is probably the best one out there: the home inspectors themselves. No, I'm not just talking about reading their websites, since anyone can put up whatever they want. Instead, we went to a group of highly respected home inspectors and posed this question: If you were hiring a home inspector to inspect a home for your out-of-state family member, what questions would you ask them?


1. What are your certifications?


If you are in one of the many states where home inspectors are licensed, that is just a minimum level to be able to do the job. As a group, we will look for a home inspector that has taken the time to get extra certifications above and beyond the minimum. There are multiple home inspection organizations (both national and local) that offer certifications for inspectors. The two major organizations are the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI), and the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI). Both offer multiple levels of certifications based on both experience and continuing education. InterNACHI has the Certified Professional Inspector and Certified Master Inspector certifications. ASHI has the ASHI Associate, Inspector, and Certified Inspector certifications.


In states where there isn't a licensing program for home inspectors, it is even more important to make sure the inspector has a certification, since essentially anyone can call themselves a home inspector! In these cases, it can be tempting to hire someone like a general contractor to just walk through the house with you. But, as Andrew Jolley with JODA Home Inspections in Stansbury Park, Utah said "unlike contractors, home inspectors have a system they follow so that all systems are evaluated and nothing is left out of the inspection." Additionally, a certified home inspector has received training on all of the systems in a house, as well how to inspect them and look at the whole house as a system.


2. What kind of report do you provide and when will I receive it?


Hopefully any legitimate inspector will be providing you with a written report that you can use in your evaluation of the home purchase. That being said, reports differ in both style and level of detail. An inspection report should include digital pictures of defects as well as narrative statements about the systems and defects found. Some reports will also include things like video, glossaries, and summaries. If there is a summary, make sure you still read the entire report!


The turnaround time for a report should also be determined. As inspectors, we understand the tight timelines your real estate agent has put you under, so we will always get you the report as quick as possible. Remember that sometimes a little extra research is required, so don't expect to get the report at the end of the inspection. Most inspectors should have the report to you within 24 hours of the end of the inspection.


3. Walk me through your typical inspection, what are the most important things?


Norm Tyler of Sage Inspections in St. Louis, MO says: "I'd ask this for a couple reasons. It would help me decide if his approach would be similar to mine. Every inspector is a little different, some will detail 500 little issues, while I'm more of a 'disregard petty cosmetic stuff so I can focus on finding $1000 problems' kind of guy. More importantly, if the inspector takes the time to walk me through his approach now, while I'm just a prospect - he'll probably take all the time needed to take care of me as a customer."


4. Are you available after you send the report for questions and/or clarification?


This was one of the most popular questions I received from the inspectors I talked to. We all strive to write a report that explains all of the issues as clearly as possible, but sometimes things may not make sense to you. Being able to call or email your inspector with questions after the inspection is critical, especially if you can't make it to the inspection.


Along with this, you should probably ask the inspector about their policy for follow-up inspections. Once you have negotiated repairs with the seller, make sure you get those repairs re-inspected. I have done a lot of re-inspections, and I have yet to find that all of the repairs were done. Sometimes I am given receipts for repairs that were clearly not even attempted. You should expect to pay for this re-inspection, so find out what it will cost ahead of time so there aren't any surprises.


5. What is your home inspection experience?


You will find that home inspectors come from many different backgrounds. Some may have been in the building trades, and some may be doing it as a second career. The important thing to look for is an inspector that has experience doing home inspections. David Sharman of County Home Inspection in Peterborough, Ontario mentioned to ask them how many inspections they've done in the last 12 months. This number could vary based on the market, but it should be a reasonable number. Look for someone doing at least a few inspections a week, but be wary of those that have really high numbers (unless they have multiple inspectors at their company). This can be a sign of someone that is just doing the minimum to get on to the next inspection of several that day.


6. How many inspections do you do in a day?


Hopefully the answer is only one or two. Most inspectors will do a morning and an afternoon inspection. Some will add in an evening inspection. If it gets over three, start to worry about how long they are spending on your inspection. Most inspections will take 2-3 hours for an average size house. Smaller houses don't really cut down on the time, but larger houses can significantly increase the amount of time it takes to inspect.


7. What extra services can you provide?


Michael Conrad II, at Diligent, LLC in Nashville, TN points out that you should check with the inspector to see if they offer any other inspection services, such as Thermal Imaging, Termite, Radon, and Mold inspections. This can help you in many ways, since not only do you get all of the inspections you need from one company, it allows your inspector to look at the whole house as a system and provide the best assessment of the house. Some areas require separate licenses for these extra inspections, so make sure they have those licenses as well if required. If licensing isn't required, make sure they have a third-party certification.


8. Can I accompany you on the inspection?


The inspection is your time to learn about the house. Odds are, the inspection is the longest amount of time you will spend in the house until you own it, so make the most of it. Your inspector should encourage you to ask questions as the inspection is going on. After all, it's a lot easier to explain (and understand) an issue with it right in front of you. If you wait until a day or two later, now the inspector has to explain it over the phone, and they've inspected more houses since then. Charles Buell, of Charles Buell Inspections, Inc in Shoreline, WA, says that he wants the client there the whole time. This is their time to learn about the house. Additionally, Jim Holl with 5 Star Home Inspections LLC in Hillsborough, NC says: A professional home inspector wants you, the future occupant, to attend the inspection so you can ask questions and see most of what the inspector sees. Since you are going to live there and get to maintain it, for safety, health and financial reasons, this is your opportunity learn all about your new castle. If the inspector doesn't want you to observe, move on to the next inspector you want to interview.


9. Who will be doing the inspection?


This is mainly for the multi-inspector firms, but Ian Mayer of IM Home Inspections in Woodland Hills, CA warns to watch out for the bait-and-switch. The owner of the company may have really great certifications, but he sends out the guy that was just certified last week to do your inspection.


10. What warranties/guarantees are included with the inspection?


A home inspection is, by definition, a snapshot in time. It shows the condition of the house on the day of the inspection. None of us have a crystal ball to predict the future of a house, and sometimes sellers will intentionally hide known defects. Some home inspectors offer various warranties and guarantees with their inspection. Make sure you read the fine print on anything offered to ensure you understand what you are getting and what the limitations are. Frank Rotte of Certified Inspection Services, LLC of San Diego points out that many repairs are actually under the deductible, so the buyer ends up paying for the repair anyways.


11. How much does the inspection cost?


This is the last question you should ask, and it's really only so you know how much to write the check out for. In other words, don't price shop, and don't look for the cheapest inspector. (How much are you paying for that house again?) James Braun with Braun Inspection Consultations in Jefferson City, MO rightly says that "A good inspector is not cheap, and a cheap inspector is not good." You are making what may be the largest purchase of your life, do you really want the cheapest inspector you can find to do your inspection?


Thank you for sticking with me for this long, and I hope that it has been informative for you. The best home inspectors are those that work for you, and inspect each home as if they, or their favorite relative, were buying it. These home inspectors have nothing to gain except providing you with the best inspection they can, which allows you to make an extremely important decision. Now, go out there and hire the best home inspector you can find.


Qualified Home Inspectors in California

 

Comments are closed.