Real Estate Inspection Services In Lead Hill Roseville, CA

Posted in Qualified Home Inspectors in California on July 11, 2017
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A professional home inspector is not only familiar with all the components of a home, but is able to evaluate the condition of the home and all of its systems. Professional Home Inspectors in Lead Hill Roseville, CA will point out the components that are not working properly as well as those that are unsafe. They will address areas where repairs may be needed or where problems may arise in the future.

How to Choose the Best Home Inspector in Lead Hill Roseville, CA?

Home Buyer\'s Checklist

The purchase of a house is probably the largest single investment you will ever make. So, it only makes sense that you should know exactly what to expect, both indoors and out, in terms of repairs, maintenance and the associated costs that come with a new--or old--home. One of the best ways to understand a home's condition is to hire a professional home inspector.

It is easy to get a List of Roseville Home Inspectors by searching online. A simple search with the keyword, “Home Inspectors in Lead Hill Roseville, CA” will produce multiple results giving you a list of Home Inspection companies, Realtors, and Real Estate Agents.

A professional home inspector is also able to make an unbiased and accurate report of the property's true condition as an expert in home inspection. This knowledge will make it much easier to assess an accurate value of home property.

Even the most knowledgeable homeowner lacks the training and depth of knowledge that only a professional Roseville home inspector provides. That is why it is so important to hire an experienced home inspector to perform the inspection on a home's property. When selecting a home inspector, be sure to choose one that will give you the quality of service you deserve and that you feel comfortable with. Consider the following questions when selecting a professional home inspector:

What are the home inspector's qualifications?
Home inspection is a trade that requires special training, knowledge, and skills. The more experienced a true professional home inspector is, the more likely they will be able to uncover any problems. Look for professional home inspectors that have sufficient practical experience, a general understanding of all components in a home, and a background in related trades. Reputable home inspectors are also more likely to be certified with a well-known association, such as ASHI (American Society of Home Inspectors) that requires them to adhere to a strict code of ethics and specific standards of practice. Always ask about their membership in various associations. You also have the right to see proof of their membership.

Septic Inspection

Can the home inspector provide quality references?
A highly regarded professional home inspector should be able to provide you with references upon your request. Be sure to take the next step and contact the people named as references Ask them if they were satisfied with the inspector's complete service and their overall experience with them.

Will the home inspector allow you to participate?
A professional home inspector in Lead Hill Roseville, CA should feel comfortable allowing you to participate throughout the inspection. Don't be afraid to get your hands dirty and ask questions along the way. A home inspectors purpose is to educate you on your home and all of it's components--learn all you can. A good suggestion is to do a little research on your home beforehand and come prepared with a list of questions for the inspector.

What is the scope of inspection?
A standard home inspection report summarizes findings from a visual inspection of the home's interior and exterior components. Exteriors components include roofing, flashing, chimneys, gutters, downspouts, wall surfaces and the foundation, including the grading around it. Interior components include electrical, heating, air conditioning, ventilation, plumbing, insulation, flooring, ceiling and wall finishes, windows and doors, basements, and any visible structures of the home. Upon completion of the inspection, the certified home inspector should provide a clear, easy to read report detailing every major home system and component within 24 hours. A good home inspector in Lead Hill Roseville, CA will also provide you with pictures of various elements to help you see and understand the true condition.

Why Should I Consider Using A Home Inspector In California?

Home Inspection New Construction

The investments of a certified home inspector are the solid education background in construction, the training attended, experience acquired and membership under known professional bodies in home inspection industry. The formal training is what builds a knowledgeable and competent inspector. These competent inspectors have gained their certification by passing the required exams under the National Home Inspector Examination.


When home buyers think of acquiring a house for investment, getting the qualified inspector is important. The report is the basis for acquiring the property. Due diligence must be exercised by potential buyers in choosing the right home inspector. Sometimes, the price tells the trusted ones. There are many inspectors good in marketing their services but are not competent.


Home buyers are assured that the inspector knows what to do. The basics and detailed manner of inspecting are being done like evaluating gas lines, inspecting the foundation and structures of attic, walls, roofs, doors, basement, air condition, electrical, and plumbing systems. The gas and water heaters are also being checked. A qualified inspector knows the different systems from the foundation to the ridge vents.


An experienced one can easily identify various problems in the reports. The fees usually depend on how highly-skilled the home inspector is. Ideally, the experienced one charges much more than the new inspector in the industry. Many inspectors can give the written report right away. Most credible inspector relay the assessment to its clients that is easy comprehend. Forms of the report could be written or computer generated report. Communication in orderly manner is one problem dealt by some home buyers. An inspector must possess an effective written and communication skills which is essential in dealing with potential buyers. The statements of the right inspector is important as this will be the basis to make a decision.


Training is the number one tool in home inspection. Inspector with certification has attended the required training in order to equip oneself with the necessary knowledge and skills in the field of home inspection. All the states require every candidates to complete a formal training from schools and pass the state examination. The test measures the competence of the candidate. Home buyers are sure that the one they hired has the right knowledge and skills. Trainings are obtained from approved training centers under National Association of Home Inspectors, National Association of Certified Home Inspectors and the American Society of Home Inspectors.


A qualified inspector is a member of a well-respected association like American Society of Home Inspectors. A member of this famous organization has continuous education. The information are always updated like the latest building methods and the advance studies. Members are also required to complete the membership requirements like completion of training and passing the examination.


Home inspection is an important part of home-buying process. The report can greatly influence the decision of the home buyers. It is the job of the home buyers to clarify if anything is unclear on the reports provided. Generally, good certified home inspector relays a good explanation to every question by the client.

Do Home Inspectors Check For Mold?

Home Inspection New Construction

25 years ago, a home inspection was a rare thing, and professional home inspectors were few and far between. Now, nearly every buyer knows that they should get an inspection, and there is a seemingly endless supply of inspectors, all claiming some 'certification' or credentials that sound impressive. But how do you know which is the right inspector for you?


Well, here are a few simple thoughts from someone inside the business (some of which, many inspectors will be upset with me for revealing, and will hope you won't read them). Interview them personally. Don't just take someone's advice that "this guy is good." Talk to them.


Ask them about what they do (and don't do - many don't walk roofs, some don't give repair cost estimates). Ask them about their reports (simple checklist, or descriptive narrative?) Do they provide repair cost estimates? Are they licensed (if necessary in your sate)? How long have they been in business? What is their background and/or training? Are they members of the BBB or Angie's List or other consumer oriented groups? Most importantly, do they treat you with respect and listen to what your needs are?


You will quickly find that there is a world of difference in Inspectors and how they view YOU, the client, as part of the inspection. Some see you as a necessary evil, or an interruption of "their" inspection. You will know you have hired one of these inspectors if they hand you a measuring tape to keep you busy measuring rooms while they inspect.


Often on inspector chat boards they talk about "controlling" their inspection, as if the client is a bother. Never forget: The inspection is (and SHOULD be) all about YOUR education, and making YOU comfortable with your new home.


E & O Insurance.


Ask your inspector if they are insured. Many inspectors treat this question as if you have just asked them for their Debit Card and PIN, but it is a legitimate and VERY intelligent question for clients to ask. You wouldn't let an uninsured plumber work on your pipes, would you? So why allow an uninsured inspector advise you on the entire home and all of its systems and components? E&O (Errors and Omissions) Insurance is your protection that if the inspector misses something significant, that you won't be left paying for that mistake.


Experience.


My dad always said: "There is no substitute in life for experience." (He also said, "Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.") This is also true when it comes to inspectors. While some may have read it in the best books available, you simply have to learn some things by doing them. (Like, for example, never test the door to a room by closing it from the inside of the room. The reason why will be instantly clear when the knob falls off in your hand and you are stuck on the interior.)


You will know just by talking to an inspector and asking them the questions listed above whether you are talking to a raw "newbie" or a seasoned pro. Some pride themselves on "writing up" lots of defects, but often, many of these items are actually quite common and relatively minor (the kinds of things most sellers won't address or compensate for). Some inspectors also pride themselves on being disliked by Realtors. This simply mystifies me since most Realtors I know honestly care about putting their client in a good home, and respect the opinion of the inspector. Most times, this indicates to me an inspector who is a little full of himself, and may be out to prove how much he knows, or wants to make a major deal out of a minor issue.


Certifications are a dime a dozen in the inspection industry. Every day, my email inbox is jammed with people selling more quick and easy "certifications" of this and that. In fact, one place will certify you (yes, you) as a "master" inspector if you take several free online courses and send them a check for $375 - without ever performing a single inspection! As you can see, certifications are highly suspect. Professionally, the ones that are truly significant are offered by the International Code Council (ICC) and certify that the inspector has a detailed understanding of current building code (particularly helpful if you are purchasing new construction).


In general, I would recommend an inspector who has performed at least 1,000 inspections, and has at least 3 years experience - but even among these, you must ask the other questions to get the best fit for your needs.


Choices.


Does the inspector offer choices to accommodate you? All buyers are not the same. All homes are not the same. So why do most inspectors offer the same inspection to all clients? Ask if they offer choices in prices, level of detail, and services offered. An investor seeking an opinion on the basic components (structure, roof, electrical, plumbing, HVAC) of a home they intend to renovate may not need the meticulous detail required by a nervous First Time Buyer. Don't be afraid to ask for what you really need, even if it seems to be more (or less) than what the inspector typically offers. If the inspector you speak to can't offer the service you need, keep searching, you will find one that does.


Price.


Which brings us to the last point, and the first question most people ask: "How much does an inspection cost?" The answer is - it depends (mostly on your area of the country, and the size of your home). Most inspectors base the price on square feet (the larger the home, the longer it takes to inspect). Be cautious of those who use price or zip code as a determining factor (buying a more expensive home in a more affluent neighborhood can dramatically increase your price with these inspectors who believe you must have more money to spend). Shop prices around. You CAN and WILL find a reasonably priced inspector who is every bit as good or better than the highest priced inspectors.


A good clue is: If someone doesn't post their prices on their website, they are higher than is typical. Again, many inspectors will react rudely with some variation of "you get what you pay for." Ask that inspector if they buy Premium Unleaded at the most expensive gas station in town, and then look through the grocery store circulars to find the highest priced items available - after all, they must be the best if they are the most expensive!


Qualified Home Inspectors in California

 

Thorough Home Inspection Lead Hill Roseville, CA

Posted in Qualified Home Inspectors in California on July 11, 2017
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A professional home inspector is not only familiar with all the components of a home, but is able to evaluate the condition of the home and all of its systems. Professional Home Inspectors in Lead Hill Roseville, CA will point out the components that are not working properly as well as those that are unsafe. They will address areas where repairs may be needed or where problems may arise in the future.

How to Choose the Best Home Inspector in Lead Hill Roseville, CA?

Mold Inspection

The purchase of a house is probably the largest single investment you will ever make. So, it only makes sense that you should know exactly what to expect, both indoors and out, in terms of repairs, maintenance and the associated costs that come with a new--or old--home. One of the best ways to understand a home's condition is to hire a professional home inspector.

It is easy to get a List of Roseville Home Inspectors by searching online. A simple search with the keyword, “Home Inspectors in Lead Hill Roseville, CA” will produce multiple results giving you a list of Home Inspection companies, Realtors, and Real Estate Agents.

A professional home inspector is also able to make an unbiased and accurate report of the property's true condition as an expert in home inspection. This knowledge will make it much easier to assess an accurate value of home property.

Even the most knowledgeable homeowner lacks the training and depth of knowledge that only a professional Roseville home inspector provides. That is why it is so important to hire an experienced home inspector to perform the inspection on a home's property. When selecting a home inspector, be sure to choose one that will give you the quality of service you deserve and that you feel comfortable with. Consider the following questions when selecting a professional home inspector:

What are the home inspector's qualifications?
Home inspection is a trade that requires special training, knowledge, and skills. The more experienced a true professional home inspector is, the more likely they will be able to uncover any problems. Look for professional home inspectors that have sufficient practical experience, a general understanding of all components in a home, and a background in related trades. Reputable home inspectors are also more likely to be certified with a well-known association, such as ASHI (American Society of Home Inspectors) that requires them to adhere to a strict code of ethics and specific standards of practice. Always ask about their membership in various associations. You also have the right to see proof of their membership.

Home Inspection Agencies

Can the home inspector provide quality references?
A highly regarded professional home inspector should be able to provide you with references upon your request. Be sure to take the next step and contact the people named as references Ask them if they were satisfied with the inspector's complete service and their overall experience with them.

Will the home inspector allow you to participate?
A professional home inspector in Lead Hill Roseville, CA should feel comfortable allowing you to participate throughout the inspection. Don't be afraid to get your hands dirty and ask questions along the way. A home inspectors purpose is to educate you on your home and all of it's components--learn all you can. A good suggestion is to do a little research on your home beforehand and come prepared with a list of questions for the inspector.

What is the scope of inspection?
A standard home inspection report summarizes findings from a visual inspection of the home's interior and exterior components. Exteriors components include roofing, flashing, chimneys, gutters, downspouts, wall surfaces and the foundation, including the grading around it. Interior components include electrical, heating, air conditioning, ventilation, plumbing, insulation, flooring, ceiling and wall finishes, windows and doors, basements, and any visible structures of the home. Upon completion of the inspection, the certified home inspector should provide a clear, easy to read report detailing every major home system and component within 24 hours. A good home inspector in Lead Hill Roseville, CA will also provide you with pictures of various elements to help you see and understand the true condition.

California Homes for Sale: How Can a Seller Get Their Property Ready for the Market?

New Home Construction

Chapter 1: Getting Started and Taking Control


Professional Associations


Before you can even begin to contact and compare home inspection companies, your first goal is to secure a list of likely home inspector candidates from a reliable and trusted source. A good first choice to consider for obtaining a list of names are the nationally recognized associations that many home inspectors belong to. To help you get started, I highly recommend 'The American Society of Home Inspectors' (ASHI) and 'The National Association of Home Inspectors' (NAHI) not only because both ASHI (founded in 1976) and NAHI (founded later in 1987 by an ASHI member) were the first of their kind but also because they still remain the two most prominent and sought after associations in the home inspection profession today.


The next step is to contact the Association you have chosen to obtain a list of its members within a fifty mile radius of the area where you're planning to buy a home. For those with online capability, the best way to proceed is to visit the Association's website to see what they have to offer. If you prefer or have to use the phone, most Associations provide a toll free number you can call in order to speak with someone who can answer your questions and provide you with the information you need. In either case, keep the following points in mind as you begin to build and refine your name list: 1) try to end up with at least six to ten names, 2) always ask for and jot down each inspector's rank or membership status within the Association including how long they've been a member, 3) in some cases you may need to contact more than one Association, and 4) take note that a home inspector may belong to more than one Association.


Referrals From Trusted Sources


Another good source of names to consider are referrals from trusted family members, friends and co-workers you have grown to respect over time, not to mention your attorney. In fact, real estate attorneys are usually very discriminating when it comes to recommending a home inspector who will serve their clients' best interests, and not the Realtor's, during the real estate transaction process.


Sources To Exclude


Unless a realtor happens to be in the family or a very close friend with your best interests at heart, all other realtor referrals should be considered suspect and disregarded making sure that none have since found their way onto your list. As for relying upon the phone directory, this is paramount to rolling dice or looking for a needle in a hay stack and is definitely not the way to go about finding a good home inspector!


Candidates And Newbies


As you continue building your name list, you want to be sure to exclude newbie home inspectors. To do this, you have to learn a little bit about an Association's membership. For example, ASHI has what they refer to as Candidates and Members. By definition, an ASHI Candidate is one who has yet to attain full membership status by satisfying certain criteria as set forth by ASHI. This is significant since Candidates are often newbies to the profession, meaning they are just learning the ropes, and typically have little experience inspecting homes. Given this information, exclude all ASHI Candidates from your list unless you're willing to hire and pay a home inspector to learn at your expense. In no disrespect to newbies, while all have to start somewhere, there's no substitute for experience!


Also note I have purposely used ASHI to explain this procedure as I am not familiar with how the other association memberships are structured. Therefore, if any of the names on your list happen to belong to an association other than ASHI, you would be will advised to learn what you can about their membership as well.


State Licensing


Some states require licensing of home inspectors while others do not. If the state in which you're looking to purchase a home does require licensing, then you need to verify that the inspector is licensed in that state and that their license has not expired so you don't end up with a worthless home inspection. This information can normally be obtained online as well as over the phone by contacting your local state agency that handles licensing of home inspectors. To find out if your state requires licensing refer to 'Links' under table of contents. Incidentally and for what it's worth, never hire a home inspector based upon licensing alone or you could be in for a rude awakening! More on this later.


General Liability And E&O Insurance


Insurance is somewhat similar to licensing in that the states that require home inspectors to be licensed may/may not also require the home inspector to carry general liability and/or errors and omissions (E&O) insurance. If the state you're planning to buy a home in requires inspectors to be insured, you should be able to easily verify this along with their license since the state will not ordinarily issue a license to a home inspector who has failed to meet this requirement. It's also a good idea to ask the inspector to produce a copy of their certificate of insurance before/on the day of the inspection for further verification. Similar to licensing, for states that don't require home inspectors to carry E&O insurance, never base your final decision to hire a home inspector on insurance alone! More on this later on.


Summary


Secure a list of inspection candidates from a well known and trusted source.


Sources include Professional Associations like ASHI and NAHI, and referrals from trusted family members, friends, co-workers, and your attorney.


Refrain from using Realtor referrals and the phone directory


Exclude ASHI Candidates and all newbie inspectors from your list.


Verify that the home inspector is licensed and insured in your state if so required.

Where & How Do I Contact A Home Inspector In California?

Home Buyer\'s Checklist

Have you noticed an interesting trend?


It seems that more and more home buyers are hiring their own home inspectors rather than depending on the agent's recommendations. In some cases, I have heard of buyers NOT using an inspector only because they were recommended by the Realtor. Although the vast majority of buyers still use the inspector recommended by their agent, it does seem to be slowly changing. As more buyers understand the true purpose of the inspection, they are learning that an inspector recommended by the Realtor may not be, or just as bad, may not appear to be, working in their best interest.


Despite what this article may seem to be, it is not an anti-Realtor rant. In fact, I firmly believe that one of the prime beneficiaries of this trend is the Realtor. If the buyer hires a poor inspector, they have no one to blame but themselves for not being diligent during the hiring process, or the inspector for being less than thorough. By not recommending an inspector, the agent can walk away from a disastrous inspection with clean hands.


Home inspectors market directly to Realtors because it is easy to do and they can get many clients if they spend all their time dropping off cards and brochures at brokers' offices. In rare but documented cases, some inspectors have even stooped to paying a fee to be included in a broker's list of "preferred inspectors", an obvious conflict of interest. Many Realtors use these inspectors because they know that if the inspector wants repeat business he will make the inspection process short and sweet...for the Realtor. Most agents want the inspection to go smoothly and quickly. They want the inspector to find very few problems, the house to be sold, to collect their commission, and to move on to the next home. In the meantime, the buyers move into their dream home filled with the joy of home ownership only to discover that the plumbing is older galvanized pipe that will have to be replaced in the near future, the AC compressor is past its useful life and needs to be replaced, and the windows in the back bedroom don't open because the foundation has settled excessively. Well, now it's really going to hit the fan. The buyer blames the agent, the agent blames the inspector and lawyers are sure to become involved. But what if the inspector had been hired by the buyer? In that case, the inspector is solely responsible for his own mess, and/or the buyers can blame themselves for not doing a little more research.


The important questions in the scenario above are: Did the inspector really miss the defects, or did he ignore them, or "soften" them so that the deal will close quickly ensuring that the Realtor will continue to give him referrals? Did the Realtor recommend this particular inspector because she knew that the inspector would do a 1 hour inspection, write a quick "checklist" report pointing out a few minor defects and most importantly "not break the deal". Unfortunately, this scenario occurs much too often.


How do we avoid this conflict of interest? Here are a few recommendations that can help avoid problems:


If you're a Realtor, stay out of the inspection process and don't recommend any inspectors at all. At the risk of sounding rude, the inspection is none of your business. In fact, most experienced inspectors make it clear to their clients that nobody, not even Realtors, have the right to see the report. It belongs exclusively to the inspector's client and can only be released by the client. Realtors should let the inspector and the client hash out the inspection, and the client will let the Realtor know whether it's thumbs up or down on the home. If it is thumbs up, you can help your client deal with the concerns found during the inspection. If it's thumbs down, then the next step is simple- Find the client another home and be thankful that your client is not moving into a home that is in bad shape and that will burden them with costly, unexpected repairs.


If you're an inspector, one of the most important things you can do is wean yourself off using Realtors for referrals. Learn to market yourself directly to homebuyers. It is not as difficult as it seems. The most important result from taking this step is that you can inspect homes without any pressure from Realtors to "not break the deal". In addition, another good rule is to "write hard, and miss nothing". A good, thorough inspection is the best way to ensure a satisfied client and reduce your liability. It is also very important to understand that your clients are most likely very nervous during the home buying process, especially if it is their first home. Their decision to buy or not is almost exclusively based on your comments and your report, so you have to tread carefully. UNDER-stating a defect will likely end up with an unhappy client, but OVER-stating a concern can scare the buyer unnecessarily, and may get you in hot water with the seller. What is critical is to forget making anyone but your client happy. You can only serve one master, and that should always be your client. If the Realtor is truly looking out for their client's interests, a good, thorough inspection (even if it breaks the deal) should not be a concern for them. On the other hand, be aware that if you call a hairline crack in the garage slab "foundation failure", you are not serving your client well, and you may see the seller reach for the phone to call a lawyer.


If you're a buyer, I recommend that you take on the responsibility of hiring your own inspector. Look at it this way; If you are buying a used car, don't you want your own mechanic to check the vehicle for serious damage? Sure a used car dealer may advertising their "500 Point Inspection!", but really, how sure are you that they checked the vehicle as well as someone who is looking out for your interests only? While most Realtors are honest and do look out for your interests, many are competitive and are anxious to make the sale. They are only human, and it's too easy to misplace their priorities.


Finding your own inspector is not difficult. Many home inspectors are now advertising on the web and a simple web search can yield many results. Making a little effort can make the home buying process easier, and less risky for everyone involved.


Qualified Home Inspectors in California

 

Comments are closed.