Typical Home Inspection Cost WestPark Roseville, CA

Posted in Qualified Home Inspectors in California on July 11, 2017
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A professional home inspector is not only familiar with all the components of a home, but is able to evaluate the condition of the home and all of its systems. Professional Home Inspectors in WestPark Roseville, CA will point out the components that are not working properly as well as those that are unsafe. They will address areas where repairs may be needed or where problems may arise in the future.

How to Choose the Best Home Inspector in WestPark Roseville, CA?

Insurance Home Inspection

The purchase of a house is probably the largest single investment you will ever make. So, it only makes sense that you should know exactly what to expect, both indoors and out, in terms of repairs, maintenance and the associated costs that come with a new--or old--home. One of the best ways to understand a home's condition is to hire a professional home inspector.

It is easy to get a List of Roseville Home Inspectors by searching online. A simple search with the keyword, “Home Inspectors in WestPark Roseville, CA” will produce multiple results giving you a list of Home Inspection companies, Realtors, and Real Estate Agents.

A professional home inspector is also able to make an unbiased and accurate report of the property's true condition as an expert in home inspection. This knowledge will make it much easier to assess an accurate value of home property.

Even the most knowledgeable homeowner lacks the training and depth of knowledge that only a professional Roseville home inspector provides. That is why it is so important to hire an experienced home inspector to perform the inspection on a home's property. When selecting a home inspector, be sure to choose one that will give you the quality of service you deserve and that you feel comfortable with. Consider the following questions when selecting a professional home inspector:

What are the home inspector's qualifications?
Home inspection is a trade that requires special training, knowledge, and skills. The more experienced a true professional home inspector is, the more likely they will be able to uncover any problems. Look for professional home inspectors that have sufficient practical experience, a general understanding of all components in a home, and a background in related trades. Reputable home inspectors are also more likely to be certified with a well-known association, such as ASHI (American Society of Home Inspectors) that requires them to adhere to a strict code of ethics and specific standards of practice. Always ask about their membership in various associations. You also have the right to see proof of their membership.

Reliable Home Inspection

Can the home inspector provide quality references?
A highly regarded professional home inspector should be able to provide you with references upon your request. Be sure to take the next step and contact the people named as references Ask them if they were satisfied with the inspector's complete service and their overall experience with them.

Will the home inspector allow you to participate?
A professional home inspector in WestPark Roseville, CA should feel comfortable allowing you to participate throughout the inspection. Don't be afraid to get your hands dirty and ask questions along the way. A home inspectors purpose is to educate you on your home and all of it's components--learn all you can. A good suggestion is to do a little research on your home beforehand and come prepared with a list of questions for the inspector.

What is the scope of inspection?
A standard home inspection report summarizes findings from a visual inspection of the home's interior and exterior components. Exteriors components include roofing, flashing, chimneys, gutters, downspouts, wall surfaces and the foundation, including the grading around it. Interior components include electrical, heating, air conditioning, ventilation, plumbing, insulation, flooring, ceiling and wall finishes, windows and doors, basements, and any visible structures of the home. Upon completion of the inspection, the certified home inspector should provide a clear, easy to read report detailing every major home system and component within 24 hours. A good home inspector in WestPark Roseville, CA will also provide you with pictures of various elements to help you see and understand the true condition.

Which Type of Home Inspector is Required for Buying Real Estate?

House Inspection Service

Have you noticed an interesting trend?


It seems that more and more home buyers are hiring their own home inspectors rather than depending on the agent's recommendations. In some cases, I have heard of buyers NOT using an inspector only because they were recommended by the Realtor. Although the vast majority of buyers still use the inspector recommended by their agent, it does seem to be slowly changing. As more buyers understand the true purpose of the inspection, they are learning that an inspector recommended by the Realtor may not be, or just as bad, may not appear to be, working in their best interest.


Despite what this article may seem to be, it is not an anti-Realtor rant. In fact, I firmly believe that one of the prime beneficiaries of this trend is the Realtor. If the buyer hires a poor inspector, they have no one to blame but themselves for not being diligent during the hiring process, or the inspector for being less than thorough. By not recommending an inspector, the agent can walk away from a disastrous inspection with clean hands.


Home inspectors market directly to Realtors because it is easy to do and they can get many clients if they spend all their time dropping off cards and brochures at brokers' offices. In rare but documented cases, some inspectors have even stooped to paying a fee to be included in a broker's list of "preferred inspectors", an obvious conflict of interest. Many Realtors use these inspectors because they know that if the inspector wants repeat business he will make the inspection process short and sweet...for the Realtor. Most agents want the inspection to go smoothly and quickly. They want the inspector to find very few problems, the house to be sold, to collect their commission, and to move on to the next home. In the meantime, the buyers move into their dream home filled with the joy of home ownership only to discover that the plumbing is older galvanized pipe that will have to be replaced in the near future, the AC compressor is past its useful life and needs to be replaced, and the windows in the back bedroom don't open because the foundation has settled excessively. Well, now it's really going to hit the fan. The buyer blames the agent, the agent blames the inspector and lawyers are sure to become involved. But what if the inspector had been hired by the buyer? In that case, the inspector is solely responsible for his own mess, and/or the buyers can blame themselves for not doing a little more research.


The important questions in the scenario above are: Did the inspector really miss the defects, or did he ignore them, or "soften" them so that the deal will close quickly ensuring that the Realtor will continue to give him referrals? Did the Realtor recommend this particular inspector because she knew that the inspector would do a 1 hour inspection, write a quick "checklist" report pointing out a few minor defects and most importantly "not break the deal". Unfortunately, this scenario occurs much too often.


How do we avoid this conflict of interest? Here are a few recommendations that can help avoid problems:


If you're a Realtor, stay out of the inspection process and don't recommend any inspectors at all. At the risk of sounding rude, the inspection is none of your business. In fact, most experienced inspectors make it clear to their clients that nobody, not even Realtors, have the right to see the report. It belongs exclusively to the inspector's client and can only be released by the client. Realtors should let the inspector and the client hash out the inspection, and the client will let the Realtor know whether it's thumbs up or down on the home. If it is thumbs up, you can help your client deal with the concerns found during the inspection. If it's thumbs down, then the next step is simple- Find the client another home and be thankful that your client is not moving into a home that is in bad shape and that will burden them with costly, unexpected repairs.


If you're an inspector, one of the most important things you can do is wean yourself off using Realtors for referrals. Learn to market yourself directly to homebuyers. It is not as difficult as it seems. The most important result from taking this step is that you can inspect homes without any pressure from Realtors to "not break the deal". In addition, another good rule is to "write hard, and miss nothing". A good, thorough inspection is the best way to ensure a satisfied client and reduce your liability. It is also very important to understand that your clients are most likely very nervous during the home buying process, especially if it is their first home. Their decision to buy or not is almost exclusively based on your comments and your report, so you have to tread carefully. UNDER-stating a defect will likely end up with an unhappy client, but OVER-stating a concern can scare the buyer unnecessarily, and may get you in hot water with the seller. What is critical is to forget making anyone but your client happy. You can only serve one master, and that should always be your client. If the Realtor is truly looking out for their client's interests, a good, thorough inspection (even if it breaks the deal) should not be a concern for them. On the other hand, be aware that if you call a hairline crack in the garage slab "foundation failure", you are not serving your client well, and you may see the seller reach for the phone to call a lawyer.


If you're a buyer, I recommend that you take on the responsibility of hiring your own inspector. Look at it this way; If you are buying a used car, don't you want your own mechanic to check the vehicle for serious damage? Sure a used car dealer may advertising their "500 Point Inspection!", but really, how sure are you that they checked the vehicle as well as someone who is looking out for your interests only? While most Realtors are honest and do look out for your interests, many are competitive and are anxious to make the sale. They are only human, and it's too easy to misplace their priorities.


Finding your own inspector is not difficult. Many home inspectors are now advertising on the web and a simple web search can yield many results. Making a little effort can make the home buying process easier, and less risky for everyone involved.

Average Cost Of A Home Inspection?

National Property Inspections

Buying a new house? If you are like most people, this is probably the largest investment you will ever make. Most likely, one of the conditions of sale will be that you have a home inspection performed, usually within a few days, and are satisfied with the results. An analysis of the property, conducted by a specially trained and completely objective home inspector, can identify non-functioning systems, damaged building components, safety issues and poor-quality installations. But how do you find a good, objective home inspector?


Finding A Good Home Inspector


Most people don't know where to start looking and simply ask their real estate agent to recommend someone. Though this approach is certainly easiest, it may not provide the best inspector for you. Many home buyers look in the phone book for an inspector. Or do a search on the Internet. Or ask their friends and family for the name of an inspector they have used in the past. Which one is best?


Chances are you will not get to meet the person you hire before he or she shows up to inspect the house you are buying. Before this, your first contact will be on the phone. Here is your chance to ask questions and see if he or she is a good fit for you. Most people's main concern here is price. How much do you charge for a home inspection? Let me say, if you want a thorough inspection done on the property expect to pay at least $250.00, and maybe up to $600.00 or more, depending on where you live. If you pay anything less than this, plan to be disappointed.


Many inspectors offer what they call a "walk-through" inspection. Though inexpensive, the inspector is not going to go on the roof, or in the attic or crawlspace. Unfortunately, these are the very places where major (read expensive) problems are likely to occur. The inspection may be cheap, but you're probably not going to find out anything about the house you don't already know.


Experience Or Education


How long has the inspector been in business? Or what experience does he or she have? The assumption here is that if the inspector has been in business a long time or has more experience, he or she must be better than the other guy. While there is some validity to this, education is much more important. Someone may have been a roofer for years before becoming a home inspector. This doesn't mean he knows anything about plumbing, or electricity, or heating. We've all heard stories about horrible home inspectors.


Training through the local, community colleges in an accredited home inspection program is your first assurance that the inspector you are hiring is familiar with all aspects of a home. Second, make sure the inspector is a member in good standing with either ASHI (American Society of Home Inspectors), iNACHI (International Association of Certified Home Inspectors), and OAHI (Ontario Association of Home Inspectors) in Ontario. All these associations require a high level of training and continuing education to maintain their membership. Third, make your you can attend the inspection and ask questions. This is really the best way for you to learn all about the home's systems and maintenance requirements. And fourth, find your own home inspector!


The "Deal-Breaker"


When you sign an Agreement To Purchase, one of the conditions usually includes having a home inspection performed to your satisfaction to ensure there is nothing wrong with the home that may have gone unnoticed during your initial visit. Your real estate agent will want you to do a home inspection for your own protection, but mostly because it reduces their liability and satisfies their requirement for full disclosure. If you think about it for a minute, at this point, the real estate agent does not want to lose the sale and will not recommend any inspector that could jeopardize his or her commission.


In real-estate circles there are inspectors that are known as "deal-breakers". These are inspectors that are known to be very thorough and objective when examining a home. These inspectors don't go easy on a home. They are working for you, and only you, not the real-estate agent or the seller. This is the inspector you want to get. Unfortunately, you will never get a referral from a real estate agent for a "deal-breaker".


Find Your Own Home Inspector


Your best bet for finding a good home inspector that will work for you, is to ask your friends and family who they have used and recommend. Ask if the inspector they used uncovered any hidden problems or saved them money. You don't want an inspector that is recommended simply because he was easy going or cheap.


Look on the Internet. If you live in Leamington, Ontario, do a search for something like "home inspector Leamington Ontario". I suggest you include the province or else you end up with inspectors from the USA or UK. Look at all you find and call a few. The quality of the website more than likely speaks to the quality of the home inspector.


Look in the phone book. Here you will find inspectors that have been around for awhile or are part of a franchise. Many of the best inspectors don't advertise in the phone book as all their work comes from word-of-mouth. Again, ask people you know.


The bottom line is that you should find your own home inspector. If your real estate agent discourages you from using your own inspector, or insists you use one of their "recommended" inspectors, then that agent is not looking out for your best interests. Remember, this may well be your home. Protect your investment. Find your own home inspector.


Qualified Home Inspectors in California

 

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